This doctoral thesis inquires the varying shapings and uses of the past in Roman imperial cities across the Mediterranean. By means of case studies, it aims at analyzing different phenomena such as the upkeep of ancient buildings, their (later) linking to the urban fabric, archaisms, transplantations and the construction of ties to the mythological foretime as well as showcasing highlights of the cities’ history via monuments, memorials, and relics.

Research

Within the mostly Rome focussed project “Present and Past in Dialog” of research group C-IV, this doctoral thesis inquires the varying shapings and uses of the past in Roman imperial cities across the Mediterranean. By means of case studies, it aims at analyzing different phenomena such as the upkeep of ancient buildings, their (later) linking to the urban fabric, archaisms, transplantations and the construction of ties to the mythological foretime as well as showcasing highlights of the cities’ history via monuments, memorials, and relics. Thus it is not only aiming at examining what kind of emphasis (and how it) was (or was not) put upon the cities’ history but also how the particular utilization of one city’s past influenced its individual urban development.