Banner der Konferenz "Causation and Cognition"

It seems quite natural that our our cognitive states are caused by objects and people around us. But how are they caused? What kind of causality is at stake? And how is this type of causality related to other types? Early modern philosophers gave different answers to these questions, rejecting traditional Aristotelian answers and creating new ones. The conference examines their answers and pays particular attention to the way they integrated their accounts of causation and cognition into all-embracing metaphysical models. It focuses on a large number of authors, ranging from Suárez to Reid, and looks both at classical thinkers (e.g. Descartes, Leibniz, Hume) and at neglected philosophers (e.g. Cavendish, Sergeant). It analyzes their background theories about the relationship between mind, matter and God, thus building a bridge from philosophy to early modern science and theology.

Program

31.5.2018
09:15 - 09:45
Causation and Cognition - A Philosophical Puzzle (Introduction)
Sebastian BenderHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Dominik PerlerHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
09:45 - 11:00
Suárez on Cognition and Occasional Causation
Dominik PerlerHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
11:00 - 11:15
Break
11:15 - 12:30
Berkeley on Causation, Cognition, and Volition
Sebastian BenderHumboldt-Universität zu Berlin
12:30 - 14:00
Lunch
14:00 - 15:15
Causation and Cognition: La Forge and Cordemoy
Tad SchmaltzUniversity of Michigan, USA
15:15 - 15:30
Break
15:30 - 16:45
Consciousness, Unconsciousness and Final Causality: Cudworth contra Descartes
Sarah HuttonUniversity of York, United Kingdom
16:45 - 17:00
Break
17:00 - 18:15
Malebranche on Human and Divine Cognition
Stephan SchmidUniversität Hamburg
19:30 - 21:00
Dinner
1.6.2018
09:15 - 10:30
“For motion produceth nothing but motion” – The Mechanical Mind in Hobbes and Spinoza
Daniel GarberPrinceton University, USA
Martine PécharmanCentre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris, France
10:30 - 10:45
Break
10:45 - 12:00
Causation, Explanation, and Conceptual Dependence in Spinoza
Martin LinRutgers University, USA
12:00 - 13:30
Lunch
13:30 - 14:45
Embodied Cognition without Causal Interaction in Leibniz
Julia JoratiOhio State University, Columbus, USA
14:45 - 15:00
Break
15:00 - 16:15
Locke on Causation and Cognition
Jennifer MarusicBrandeis University, USA
16:15 - 16:30
Break
16:30 - 17:45
John Sergeant on the Formal Cause of Cognition
Han Thomas AdriaenssenRijksuniversiteit Groningen, the Netherlands
19:30 - 21:00
Dinner
2.6.2018
09:15 - 10:30
Reason, as a Kind of Cause
Peter KailUniversity of Oxford, United Kingdom
10:30 - 10:45
Break
10:45 - 12:00
Reid on Causation and Intentionality
James Van CleveUniversity of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA
12:00 - 14:00
Lunch