Resafa (A-1-8)

Research project

One of the main research topics of this project is the analysis of urban development in a semiarid environment. Thus the colonization of a marginal habitat and its determining factors was an important focus of research.

Spatial analysis of settlement patterns in Bithynia (A-6-6-1)

Dissertation

The doctoral thesis assesses the economic development of ancient Bithynia situated in the North West territory of Asia Minor during the Hellenistic, Roman and Early Byzantine periods. The study draws for the most part on published data, enriched only modestly by research in the field. The main contribution of the work lies in an elaboration, streamlining, analysis and presentation of already known information.

Bell sound and public space in the Middle Ages (C-6-7)

Research project

In the medieval city in Central Europe the public and public cultures were not only shaped by institutionalized competences, but by multimedia signs, signals, and their perception. The main topic of this project is the interference of acoustic spheres – as they are created by noise, music and bells sounds – and the constitution of spatial structure and significance (juridical, social, transcendental) in the middle ages.

Sense of place and identity in the prehistoric Mediterranean Islands (B-4-COFUND-1)

Third-party funded project

Islands have a distinct “sense of place”: studies of present-day island communities indicate that their perceived physical containment, which is felt particularly on small islands, results in strong place identification or in an “island identity”.  As an archaeologist, Helen Dawson is interested in finding evidence for such place-identification in the past. The smaller islands surrounding Sicily, with their rich archaeological record, provided ideal case studies to test these ideas – from their initial colonisation during the Neolithic to their becoming integrated in wider trading and inter-cultural networks during the Bronze Age (ca. 5500-900 BCE).

Ontology of Immaterial Causes (D-4-1)

Research project

Descriptions of heavenly realms and celestial topography can be traced back to the cultural milieu of Second Temple Judaism, which may have been influenced by Platonic and Neo-Platonic concepts. Cosmographic and cosmological ideas were further attested during Late Antiquity in Old and New Testament apocryphal writings and parabiblical compositions, such as the Book of the Secrets of Enoch (or 2 Enoch), Apocalypse of Abraham, Ascension of Isaiah, Third Baruch, Apocalypse of Paul, Apocalypse of the Virgin Mary, etc.), which survive in Slavonic recensions transmitted in the Byzantine Commonwealth. In some cases the Slavonic texts are the only surviving witnesses to the Semitic originals; otherwise they represent faithful reproductions of Greek (Byzantine) redactions.

Epistemology of Immaterial Causes (D-4-2)

Research project

Being a part of the work of research group (D-4) into the causal relationship between the incorporeal, immaterial or spiritual world, the project works on final causality in nature and the spiritual entities, which generally speaking were able to guarantee the natural laws.

Philosophical Poetry of Immaterial Causes (D-4-3)

Research project

As part of the research group’s inquiry into the forms of causal relationships between the incorporeal, immaterial, or spiritual realm and the physical world, the project concentrates on the capacity of language, in particular poetic language, to refer to and represent entities that do not seem to be circumscribed by space.

Forum - Spatial Data Analysis (A-SDA)

Forum

    The Forum — Spatial Data Analysis is an inter-area research group that deals with the documentation and analysis of spatial data gathered from documentation, landscape analyses and reconstructions. Besides the actual work of data collection in archaeology and cultural heritage in connection with investigations of geo-physics, soil science, pollen analysis, and remote sensing, […]

Immaterial Causes and Physical Space (D-4)

Research Group

The research group will deal with several forms of causal relationships between the incorporeal, immaterial, or spiritual realm and the physical world in classical antiquity and in late ancient writers, including both pagans and Christians. Research will concentrate on philosophical and theological theories of causal efficacy, the underlying conceptual frameworks, and their transformation in the […]