Ancient Egyptian Underworld (C-4-5)

Research project

In this research project, Daniel Werning investigated the diagrammatic representation of the Ancient Egyptian underworld as attested in the Book of Caverns, an Egyptian Netherworld Book from the 13th century BCE.

Persuading the Divine: On the Composition of Hittite Prayers (C-1-X-5)

Dissertation

This Ph.D. thesis investigated the composition and rhetoric of Hittite prayers. Different aspects of how speech is used in prayers to direct the attention of the addressed deity in such a way that he/she will grant the presented requests were examined. A special focus was on the different textual elements that can be identified in the prayers, their organisation and function within the texts, and the use of older prayers to compose new ones.

Funeräre Texte des Alten Ägypten (C-1-X-2)

Dissertation

Every language and culture has its own way of speaking of perception. This Ph.D. project concentrates on the syntax and semantics of perception verbs in Hieroglyphic Egyptian. The lexicalization patterns of verbs of the five sensory modalities of sight, hearing, touch, smell and taste are being studied against the background of methods and theories coming from the field of Cognitive Linguistics and Lexical Semantics.

Meroitic Fine Ceramics (A-6-5)

Research project

This project studied a pottery workshop and the associated ceramics in Musawwarat es-Sufra, a unique sacral site of the Meroitic period (3rd century BC to 4th century AD) in Sudan. A propos this material, the project investigates a wide range of aspects concerning the production, distribution and use of Meroitic pottery.

Corpus defixionum Atticarum (B-5-6)

Research project

Focus of this research project was the final edition of roughly 510 curse tablets discovered in Athens and Attica (including around 40 inedita) within the new Corpus defixionum Atticarum.

Ancient Succession Narratives (B-5-1)

Research project

This project has investigated issues of succession in various cultural and religious contexts of the ancient Mediterranean and neighboring areas. In particular, it was examined how narratives of succession and/or genealogy served to create and stabilize collective identities, and how attempts were made to demarcate these from other sources of knowledge authorities and traditions.

The Borders of Rom (B-2-6)

Research project

The goal of this project was to determine what qualities the boundaries of ancient Rome possessed, and to comment on those qualities in a monograph.

Water Spaces (B-1-1)

Research project

This project had its focus on the diverse ways water was conceptualized and dealt with in antiquity. It especially aimed at finding new approaches to an understanding of the relation between men, states, and the sea in Classical Greece and Rome.

Intellectual Spaces in Narratives of the City (C-6-5)

Research project

During the era of Roman republic, Punic Carthage was not only the aemula Romae in the sense of political hostility and rivalry in the struggle for supremacy in the Western mediterranean. In Greek and Latin texts which are, with very few exceptions, written by either Roman or pro-Roman authors, Carthage is consequently depicted as a city that is on the one hand the non-Roman ‚Other‘ par excellence. On the other hand Carthage bears a number of similarities to Rome, to whose destiny it is fatally linked.

Antiochia (C-6-4)

Research project

This project dealt with the image of the city created by the Christian preacher John Chrysostom (ca. 349–407) in its relation to the urban context. The literary model of the Syrian metropolis Antioch presented in Chrysostom’s homilies and writings does not intend to give an accurate depiction of the historical polis of Antioch in the fourth century, but reflects the author’s religious, social and political preoccupations and visions.