Genealogical and Dynastic Space (B-5-7)

Research project

The research project focused on politically loaded concepts of space, especially in archaic and Hellenistic Greece and Augustan Rome, resp. The leading concepts were genealogical notions of space and “dynastic” concepts.

Region and Memoria (B-4-2)

Research project

The focus of this numismatic research project was the comparative analysis of the coinage of two Thracian poleis, both of which minted coins under Roman rule. The first polis is Philippopolis (modern Plovdiv), located in central Thrace, and the seat of the Thracian Koinon; the other is the western Thracian polis Pautalia (modern Kjustendil), whose warm healing springs had provided the city with high supra-regional prestige already in antiquity.

Oikonomia and Agora (B-3-8)

Research project

This research project investigated the question when and how the agora developed into a marketplace and what influence it had on the oikonomia as such. The working hypothesis was that the market and the increasing use of coins (also politically conditioned) largely determined the literary discourse on oikonomia.

Aristotele’s Oikonomika (B-3-5)

Research project

This research project examined Aristotle’s theory of the Greek “household” as a spatial and functional (buildings, real estate and other property), social (nuclear family) and power-based (male-female, father-child, master-slave relations) phenomenon. The objective was to situate this theory in the framework of Aristotle’s analysis of the polis societies of his day, and to interpret the theory as a reaction to real historical economic changes occurring in Greece in the late 5th and 4th c. BC.

The Transformations of Chrematistics (B-3-7)

Research project

In this project, Joseph Vogl demonstrated through the theme of chrematistics and its profile of characteristics how economic processes and social structures permeate and pervade each other.

The Borders of Rom (B-2-6)

Research project

The goal of this project was to determine what qualities the boundaries of ancient Rome possessed, and to comment on those qualities in a monograph.

Big Buildings – Big Architecture? (B-2-3)

Research project

A striking characteristic of many ancient Near Eastern buildings is their vastly oversized dimensions. Based on examples of early monumental buildings in Uruk (Southern Iraq, late 4th to late 3rd millennium BC) and on the Roman Temple of Jupiter at Baalbek (Lebanon), the project involved the quantification of expenditures for building materials and organization, as well as the translation of the results to terms of economy. These examples contributed to the discussions of research group (B-2-) XXL – Monumentalized Knowledge on the definition of monumentality at various times and in diverse parts of the world, the addressees, and the implicit conceptions of space.

Monumentality as Policy (B-2-2)

Research project

This project investigated the function(s) of oversized building projects in the Ancient Near East. Research was conducted into the logistical and economical  aspects involved in implementing large-scale building projects and references the cuneiform archives of the 3rd and early 2nd millennium BC and the monumental expansion of the city of Babylon that took place under the reign of king Nebuchadnezzar II (604-562 BC).

Infrastructure (B-1-4)

Research project

The research project continued the work of the former research group (B-I-1) Surveying and Limitation that examined ways in which spaces are defined and constituted through acquisition and demarcation. Five research fields of this former group were investigated.

Early Medieval Governance Resource (B-1-3)

Research project

The infrastructures of late antiquity were of fundamental importance to the politico-military, ecclesiastical and economic organization of the so-called “Germanic” kingdoms that succeeded the Roman Empire.