Wire Drawing and the Associated Tools in Antiquity (D-5-5-1)

Dissertation

The aim of this PhD project is to show that wires were in fact drawn in wire in antiquity and to provide an account of how the technique of wire drawing emerged.  To this end, drawplates are identified and catalogued and microscopic analysis of wires are conducted together with jewellers and conservators with the aim of reconstructing the actual production methods and their development.

The water clock (A-3-8)

Research project

The project used 3-D-scans of preserved water clocks to measure and to analyse these genuine testimonies of ancient technology in detail with reference to their development and their functionality in a previously unique way.

The beginnings of iron smelting in the area of the Przeworsk culture (A-5-2-2)

Dissertation

The spread of technical innovations such as iron smelting required basic natural resources (iron ore) and manual skills along with social acceptability and necessity. The dissertation investigated the beginnings of iron smelting in the area of the Przeworsk culture (Poland). It is assumed that the earliest stages of local and regional iron production coincide with the emergence of the Przeworsk culture within the 2nd century BC.

Early Wool Processing in South East and Central Europe (A-4-1-1)

Dissertation

In order to investigate the introduction of fleece baring sheep husbandry and the subsequent “textile revolution” the doctoral research project “Archaeological Evidence for Early Wool Processing in South East and Central Europe” was focused on examining major changes in Eneolithic textile technologies that could be associated with the proposed raw fibre material innovation

Roms "Größe" (B-2-1)

Research project

This project explored the question of what factors led to an imperial building project being judged as megalomaniacal or not. The research project then focused particularly on Imperial Rome and builds on the Palatine Hill project (DAI).

Archaeozoological Analyzes of Domestic Sheep (A-4-2)

Research project

This research project was devoted to the process of a major economic shift in sheep husbandry that by the end of the 4th millennium BC took place in South-West Asia. From that time onwards, sheep management was rather focused on fiber exploitation than on meat and milk, requiring the transformation of sheep with hairy coat to those with a woolly vlies.

Early Use of Wool in the Near East and Europe (A-4-1)

Research project

Within the scope of this project, two dissertations investigated indirect archaeological evidence of textile production in two separate study areas: the Near East and the South East and Central Europe.

Mapping Water Technology (A-3-3)

Research project

This research project investigates the emergence of hydromechanics in the context of water management systems from antiquity to the Middle Ages.