Grenzorganisation und Grenzpolitik in der spätrömischen Kyrenaika (B-1-3-1)

Dissertation

The organizational arrangement of the borders on the periphery of the Roman empire played a central role in Roman defensive strategy. One of the most important organizational innovations of the Late Roman Period was the establishment of frontiers, which were usually entrusted to a military functionary bearing the title of dux limitis. The goal of this doctoral project was to investigate the organizational structures of a Late Roman ducatus in the region of Cyrenaica (present-day eastern Libya), structures which were largely shaped by military requirements.

Travelling Things: Thinking on the character of ‘Roman imports’ in Central Germany’s ‘Barbaricum’ (B-4-4-1)

Dissertation

The aim of this study was to investigate the character of the “Roman import” phenomenon. In the past, “Roman imports” were usually discussed as objects in anthropocentric conceptualized contexts like trade contacts, mercenary services, gift exchanges, predatory economies and ethnic identities. In his dissertation project, by contrast, Schreiber offers a thinking perspective, that ‘Roman import’ should not be seen merely as a scientific construction, or an empirical category. Instead, he takes a symmetrical point of view. From a theoretical neo-materialistic perspective, Schreiber argues that things are not objects but assemblages (cf. DeLanda). They are heterogeneous and fluid entities. Therefore, to analyze things means to analyze not their stable essences but their intra-active enactments (cf. Barad) and entanglements.

Ontology of Immaterial Causes (D-4-1)

Research project

Descriptions of heavenly realms and celestial topography can be traced back to the cultural milieu of Second Temple Judaism, which may have been influenced by Platonic and Neo-Platonic concepts. Cosmographic and cosmological ideas were further attested during Late Antiquity in Old and New Testament apocryphal writings and parabiblical compositions, such as the Book of the Secrets of Enoch (or 2 Enoch), Apocalypse of Abraham, Ascension of Isaiah, Third Baruch, Apocalypse of Paul, Apocalypse of the Virgin Mary, etc.), which survive in Slavonic recensions transmitted in the Byzantine Commonwealth. In some cases the Slavonic texts are the only surviving witnesses to the Semitic originals; otherwise they represent faithful reproductions of Greek (Byzantine) redactions.

Infrastructure (B-1-4)

Research project

The research project continued the work of the former research group (B-I-1) Surveying and Limitation that examined ways in which spaces are defined and constituted through acquisition and demarcation. Five research fields of this former group were investigated.

Early Medieval Governance Resource (B-1-3)

Research project

The infrastructures of late antiquity were of fundamental importance to the politico-military, ecclesiastical and economic organization of the so-called “Germanic” kingdoms that succeeded the Roman Empire.

Water Spaces (B-1-1)

Research project

This project had its focus on the diverse ways water was conceptualized and dealt with in antiquity. It especially aimed at finding new approaches to an understanding of the relation between men, states, and the sea in Classical Greece and Rome.

Space and Time in Neo-Platonism and Scholasticism (D-3-2)

Research project

There is little doubt that Plato’s and Aristotle’s theories of space and time laid the basis for the late ancient and the medieval debate about space and time. This project explored how the Platonic and Aristotelian heritage was interpreted and systematically developed in Late Antiquity and medieval times.