Roms "Größe" (B-2-1)

Research project

This project explores the question of what factors led to an imperial building project being judged as megalomaniacal or not. The research project then focuses particularly on Imperial Rome and builds on the Palatine Hill project (DAI).

Ruins – Museum Visions (C-3-3)

Research project

Background of this research project is the 1882 Schinkel Competition and the “Open Competition for the Development of Museum Island in Berlin”, held in 1883/84. Fifty-two architects and architects’ associations took part in the latter competition in 1883 with the goal to develop and select a masterplan for an ensemble of museums on Spree Island in Berlin’s city center. The resulting blueprints for the redesign of Berlin’s Museum Island are today held at the Architecture Museum of the Technische Universität Berlin and served as the basis for this research project.

Big Buildings – Big Architecture? (B-2-3)

Research project

A striking characteristic of many ancient Near Eastern buildings is their vastly oversized dimensions. Based on examples of early monumental buildings in Uruk (Southern Iraq, late 4th to late 3rd millennium BC) and on the Roman Temple of Jupiter at Baalbek (Lebanon), the project involves the quantification of expenditures for building materials and organization, as well as the translation of the results to terms of economy. These examples contributed to the discussions of research group (B-2-) XXL – Monumentalized Knowledge on the definition of monumentality at various times and in diverse parts of the world, the addressees, and the implicit conceptions of space.

Usage and demand of space (C-6-1)

Research project

The pragmatic arrangement of multivalent public space which continues to characterize present-day urban and architectural planning also was a major challenge for ancient cities. The aim of this research project was to examine the arrangement of public spaces concerning their use as multivalent spaces, referring to the example of Rome and selected Roman cities from the age of the middle republic to late antiquity.

Ruins and Space (C-3-4)

Research project

This project investigates the questions of whether and in what way the “making” of artificial ruins and their subsequent preservation and restoration, presentation and communication has changed over time. Because excavating is always destructive, and hence not all historical phases of a site can be preserved, decisions are made in the course of an excavation considering: which periods are the overriding concern of the excavation, which phases are to be preserved and documented (and how thoroughly). Decisions about the presentation of the site and which aspects of a site are to be given prominence and in what form involve discussions about reconstruction. By reflecting on decisions and developments at archaeological sites from the end of the 19th century until today, the project aims to create a heightened awareness of the importance of archaeological site management in the German research community.

Simitthus, Tunisia (A-1-4)

Research project

The influences of extensiv raw material extraction, the processing of the workpieces and their distribution in Mediterranean world as well as the influences of the local landscape and city development of Simitthus (Tunisia) are major tasks of this research project. One focus is studying the use of the marmor Numidicum in different periods of time from the 2nd century BC until the 7th century AD to get a spectrum of utilization. The project is as well dealing with fundamental questions to trading and commerce, as to the quarries and agents in the marble business.