Comunicative strategies in new contexts: from verse inscriptions to literary epigrams (C-1-X-7)

Dissertation

This Ph.D. project focuses on dedicatory epigrams from the Hellenistic era. The work follows the most recent exegetic line in studies on epigrammatic poetry which acknowledges the important relationship between Hellenistic ‘literary’ epigrams and epigraphic poetry. For this reason, inscribed and ‘literary’ examples are considered together. In particular, the analysis focuses on the use of deictic expressions in dedicatory epigrams, i.e. on the use of all those linguistic elements whose meaning and interpretation depend on the spatial and temporal context where they are uttered.

Contested space - Paul’s metaphors of dominion in Romans 5-8 (C-2-1-2)

Dissertation

The focus of this Ph.D. project is the concept of dominion with reference to the dominated and its space. The letter Apostel Paul wrote to the Romans in the first century AD is being approached with a historical critical method, i.e. every word is analysed with the methods of traditional historical philology, focusing on lexical units and looking at syntactical links. Also, the Metaphor Identification Procedure is applied.

The literary representation of Rome and its urban spaces in the two historiographical works of Tacitus (C-6-6-1)

Dissertation

The aim of this Ph.D. project is to elucidate the specific Tacitean representation of the urbs Roma in comparison to other literary representations and the material Rome of the Tacitean age which as part of a specific construction of past and memory reflects a subjective “Romerlebnis” that exemplifies important aspects of former values and norms.

In particular, the investigation focuses on how Tacitus perceives, presents, connotes and functionalizes the city, its urban spaces and topographies which among others implies questions about thematic, symbolic, characterizing or psychologizing functions that can be identified in the text.

 

Literary studies on imperial Greek doxographical texts (B-5-2-2)

Dissertation

The project aims to investigate a certain group of imperial Greek texts known as ‘doxographical texts’ from a literary perspective. The primary aim is to show that doxography is an independent literary form of philosophico-scientific re-writing within the larger context of imperial Greek literature.

Early Christianity in the Kalykadnos valley and adjacent areas (B-5-4-1)

Dissertation

This project investigates the history of early Christianity in the Kalykadnos valley and adjacent areas. To fulfill this task a cross-disciplinary approach has been chosen. A variety of sources – ranging from literary to epigraphic and archaeological material – is taken into account.

Ausdrücke des Raumes und der Zeit in übersetzungsnubischen Bibeltexten (C-1-X-4)

Dissertation

This Ph.D. project aims at gaining new insight into medieval-Christian Nubia by focusing on its literary tradition. At its centre are expressions of spatial and temporal perspectivation in Old Nubian biblical texts, especially postpositional expressions which are equivalent to prepositions in e.g. Indo-Germanic languages.

 

Oikonomia and Domestic Economy in Classical Greece (B-3-5-1)

Dissertation

There is a certain irony involved in the discussion of ancient Greek household economy. Although the very concept of ‘Hauswirtschaft’ sparked the debate on the nature of the Ancient economy at the end of the 19th century, this debate never ventured far in developing a theory of household economy. This may be no accident. Despite all the polarization, so called ‘modernists’ and ‘primitivists’ shared a common notion of household economy (or ‘domestic economy’). It was supposed to be an archaic form of economic organization, aiming at autarky and self-sufficiency.

This Ph. D.-thesis follows a different lead. In classical times (ca. 450 – 300 B. C. E.) the Greek household economy adapted to the monetized markets of its urban environment. Not only that: the household was never surpassed as the most efficient form of economic organization.