Elitenwandel im Neuen Reich (Z-BerGSAS-X-12)

Dissertation

During the New Kingdom, there was a profound change in the elite of Egypt and the Levant, which were responsible for the launching and fostering of the mutual relationships between these regions and their rulers in terms of politics, military, economy and culture. To what extent these changes are responsible for the deaths of nations at the end of the late Bronze Age is the aim of this dissertation, in which a phrosographic study of all relevant groups of persons on the basis of egyptian and levantic sources should shed more light on it. Furthermore, there shall be a reconstruction of the channels and modes of communication, in which these gropus of persons had interacted.

 

The Glass, Faience and Food in Late Bronze Age Societies (A-6-COFUND-1)

Third-party funded project

This project aimed to establish an in-depth understanding of the administration and control of high-temperature (glass, faience and food) industries on an urban level and the socio­ economic relationship between the elite and the non-elite members of society in Late Bronze Age (LBA) Egypt and Mesopotamia (c. 1650-1050 BC).

Eastern Promises of Salvation (B-5-COFUND-1)

Third-party funded project

The project set out to examine how ancient Christianities located beyond the frontiers of Rome in late antique Western and Central Asia were shaped by the dual promises of empire and salvation.

Water Management of Mesopotamia (A-3-6)

Research project

This research project provided a close examination of the earliest cuneiform sources related to water management and examines its technological and social aspects in the Sumerian city-state economies of Southern Mesopotamia.

Wool in Western Asia (A-4-1-2)

Dissertation

The project focuses regionally on Western Asia with a chronological timeframe from the 7th millennium through 3rd millennium BCE. Its objective is to find direct and indirect evidence for the introduction of wool as a textile fiber and study the procuring and processing of textile raw materials. The two main strands of evidence for this dissertation thesis are published textile traces and spindle whorl data collected from 23 sites. The project is designed to identify patterns of change related to textile production on a large regional and chronological scale.

The Beginnings of Iron (A-5-3)

Research project

This project focuses on the cultural, economic and social role of iron in the ancient Near East during the Late Bronze Age, with particular attention paid to the evidence from the Hittite Anatolia.

Migration Narratives (B-4-3)

Research project

This project focused on repetitive plots and role patterns historians and archaeologists use to describe and explain human migration, thereby constructing landscapes of identity.

The Art of Conjuration (B-4-1)

Research project

The extensive surviving ritual literature of the Hittite archives is distinguished by its clear connections to non-Hittite sources; “foreign” rituals were adopted in Hattusa, and a whole series of rituals can be explicitly differentiated in terms of regional “ritual schools” – or at least they give this impression. The sources provide not only the name of the “author” of individual rituals, but also his place of origin; whole groups are assigned places of origin, so that the literature speaks of “Arzawa Rituals”, “Kizzuwatna Rituals”, and so on. However, whereas in the archives of the capital city Hattusa one encounters a whole series of rituals that very clearly originate from elsewhere – Northern Syria, Mittani, Assyria or Babylon – the majority of this “imported” ritual literature does not differ from the remaining Hittite sources. Thus, the question naturally arises what was the nature of the statements of origin contained in so many of these texts. Are we actually dealing with local reception of “global” knowledge, or with a fiction? Can the knowledge that underlies these rituals and ritual groups be distinguished on the basis of regional origins? More generally, what role is played by this regional localization of knowledge traditions? Can knowledge be divided into “global” and “regional”, and if so, how do these classes interact?